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Get load average in a more parse-able format

 $ python -c 'import os; print os.getloadavg()[0]'

— by FoxWilson on Jan. 5, 2013, 3:32 a.m.


In short, it runs a Python one-line script which imports the 'os' module and uses it to get the load average. It then indexes into a tuple, using the index of zero. The tuple is like this: (one-minute-average, five-minute-average, fifteen-minute-average), so you could substitute 0 for 1 to get the five minute load average, or 2 to get the fifteen minute load average. I find this really useful when writing larger bash one-liners which require this information, as I don't have to parse the output of uptime.


Requires Python.


Show dd status every so often

 $ watch --interval 5 killall -USR1 dd

— by FoxWilson on Dec. 6, 2012, 6:16 p.m.


The dd command has no progress indicator. While copying large files it may seem like nothing is happening, as dd prints nothing until completed. However, when the dd process receives USR1 signal, it prints I/O statistics to standard error and resumes copying. Here we use killall to send the signal, and we call it with watch to repeat this every 5 seconds, effectively giving a progress indicator to good old dd.

Start in one window the watch:

$ watch --interval 5 killall -USR1 dd

Start copying in another:

$ dd if=/dev/random of=junk bs=1000 count=1000 
dd: warning: partial read (13 bytes); suggest iflag=fullblock
0+2 records in
0+2 records out
21 bytes (21 B) copied, 3.01687 s, 0.0 kB/s
0+3 records in
0+3 records out
29 bytes (29 B) copied, 8.02736 s, 0.0 kB/s